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Sutton Organ

Sutton Organ
The Sutton Organ

The Sutton Organ of Jesus College, Cambridge, installed 1849, restored 1968 and 2012

J Bishop & Sons Mander Organs (1971)

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William Drake Organ Builders (2012)

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GREAT

 

CHOIR

 

Open Diapason

8

Open Diapason

8

Stopt Diapason

8

Stopt Diapason

8

Principal

4

Principal

4

Flute

4

Flute

4

Twelfth

2 2/3

 

 

Fifteenth

2

PEDAL

Tierce

1 3/5

Pull-downs to Choir

Sexquialtra

II

Pedal coupler to Great

 

 

PITCH: A430 @ 18 degrees

Celsius

TEMPERAMENT: Fifth-comma meantone

 

The ‘Sutton’ organ at Jesus College, Cambridge was given to the College by Sir John Sutton, Fellow Commoner, and built by Bishop & Sons in 1849.  The organ builders used pipework from the 17th century alongside new stops in the instrument and the casework was painted by the famous Gothic revivalist, Augustus Pugin. The new organ played a major part in the revival of music in Jesus College Chapel in the mid-nineteenth century after a period of neglect and decline.

In the 1920s, the instrument was incorporated into a four-manual organ as the Choir and Echo divisions by Harrison & Harrison. In 1968, Noel Mander reinstated the Sutton organ as an instrument in its own right, albeit sharing a pedal Bourdon with the new organ he was building for the Chapel.  A new, modern console was placed on the side opposite to the organ’s original console, thereby requiring the soundboard to be turned by 180 degrees to enable a new, mechanical action to be made.  The front portion of the old keys had been retained, together with the Bishop pedalboard and stop knobs.  Mr William Drake was commissioned in 2007 to return the organ to its original state.

As a result of the restoration of the Sutton Organ, completed in December 2012, Jesus College possesses a unique instrument, reflecting through the spirit of the casework, the 17th century pipes from Durham and the reinstatement of the original specification, an important period of English music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.